Forum

Objects tracking in water


#1

Hi
I would like to track objects in water. Max 50 cm deep.
IR lighting/camera doesn’t work because of reflections from moving water surface.
Can Kinect acquire depth images of submersed objects?
thx, dimi


#2

Hey,
i was doing something similar last year. The kinect is a no go it also sees the reflections and everything goes to hell after that.
For my case i attached an IR emitter on the object and then tracked it with IR camera in VJO. The camera was with 940nm filter and the emitter was 0.5w IR 940nm. Worked like a charm .
i don’t know what your object is but if you can try with IR embitter this could be and option.
Other options that i have explored are acselerometers but it seems way too complicated . Also Is it viable for you to track simply a color ?

Just my 2 cents there :)


#3

Hi synth
thanks for info. I need blobs, so the single IR emmiters is not a solution for me.
And additionally I would like to project on tracking area, so color tracking is also not. I gonna try rear/back lighting


#4

Ah that explains it.

Went to my friends pool with the Kinect … it totally freaks out.

In my case the camera filter was blocking all light except for the 940nm wavelength, so the camera basically sees just a blob of light and since it is invisible to anything else was perfect for my solution.
Was using something similar to Light up people on stage with a projector too.
Kinda like the DIY optical MT tables are made.
At the time i was way too noob to do it with vvvv so VJO did the job :)

May I ask what the object is or a basic idea behind it ?
Who know with all the ppl here we might pull the solution out of our collective hats :)


#5

Just wonder how to track fishes in the tank


#6

That sounds interesting indeed :)

i don’t have fishes but thinking about it isn’t some kind of trautner/background/difference filter going to work …
I mean its not going to be perfect but still might do the job as a proof of concept.
IR light a bit from the side so the reflection does not go directly in the camera …

interesting case :)